Gave it another try

This week I actually wore shoes to work as opposed to wearing my boot. I have to say that shoes aren’t my friend right now, as the area affected in my achilles is at the back of my heel. You can imagine what shoes feel like in that area.  Normally you would not see me wearing my good running shoes to work. I usually wear the ones that are worn out or not used for training anymore. But lately, I’ve had to resort to all of my Skechers shoes because they are soft in the heel counter. They are not rigid like most shoes, and are extremely flexible. Love my Skechers Performance!
I went for a visit to a friend of mine who is also a chiropractor in the area. I told him about the issues that I am having and that I was looking for any type of alternative/holistic treatments he might be able to offer me. My one hour appointment ended up being two hours, and it was worth it! We discussed my health history, and my running history also. I told him what my long term goals are for my running and asked him to help me achieve them with his expertise. We decided to first go with some manual massage to my calf muscles. The Gastrocnemius and Soleus muscles were extremely tight and full of knots. This places a lot more pull on the achilles, and thus attributed to my injury. This picture shows the anatomy very well.
This is what happened to my achilles, it started to form calcifications which are extremely painful. If I understand correctly, these are embedded in the tendon, and not just attached to the heel bone as you would imagine. (I’m sure my dr will correct me if I’m not explaining it right!)
So basically with each step, the calcium moves a little and it makes the back of my heel hurt and burn. I’ve tried ice, heat, wrapping, you name it. No matter what, this just doesnt seem to want to go away. The massage therapist at the chiropractors, worked extensively on my gastroc and soleus and I won’t lie, it hurt like hell. After he was finished though, it felt much better. I also had some laser treatments and went back in with the doctor, who did some manual manipulation on my ankle. I left there feeling pretty good.
I’m sure most of you runners know about DOMS, delayed onset muscle soreness. For the non-runners, it’s the thing where after a hard workout, your soreness gets progressively worse for about 3 days. I had my treatments on Wednesday, and was feeling pretty good. Thursday evening, after consulting with my running coach, Caleb Masland, we decided it would be safe for me to try riding the stationary bike for only 10 mins. (Right now, I am banned from running per doctor’s orders. We are going to re-assess this in February.) The idea is no running so as to get the achilles to heal and be pain free. I figured 10 mins on the bike wasn’t going to do any damage and I was feeling great anyway. Had a nice, pain-free ride!
Friday morning I had just a little bit of pain, but it got worse as the day went on. Last night I did nothing but sit and knit, hoping that it was going to be gone by morning. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. This morning was a lot worse. The pain was back full force, along with the burning and stinging sensations. So much for my 10min bike ride.
I am beginning to get sick of not running. I can go out and run if I want to, but I’m not going to get any better if I do. The non-runners don’t understand. I HAVE to run. As far as I’m concerned, it’s not an option. I worked so hard to get back to it after being too obese to even walk outside in the summer. I am not going to give that up now. I’ve come too far. I completed my first marathon.. do you really think I want to stop now???????
Depressed I am, and hoping that with more treatments and tons of foam rolling, it will come around.  I’m still keeping at my core workouts, but they certainly are not as fun as hitting the road. Even in the winter, as cold as it gets, I would give anything for a 5 miler right now.
And so I guess for now, you may see me walking around in this.  🙁  Oh well…
This article was originally posted by Louise Cunningham on Runnersramblings.com.


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